4 signs that you're headed for an air conditioning repair

4 signs that you’re headed for an air conditioning repair

We rely on our air conditioning to keep us cool and comfortable in the summer. Sometimes, an air conditioning unit breaks for no apparent reason. More often than not however, AC units show some signs that they’re headed for a breakdown. Many people don’t recognize these symptoms of trouble, so they may be surprised when their AC unit stops working. Recognizing the signs of trouble before your unit stops could help prevent a more expensive, more time-consuming repair. These four tell-tale symptoms can help you spot potential trouble in time to avoid an expensive air conditioning repair.

Signs of an imminent air conditioning repair

Noises. Every air conditioning unit makes noise. The compressor (outside) turns on and off during normal operation. Air moves through the air handler and ductwork. In short, you’re going to hear your air conditioning unit when it runs. If the unit makes strange noises – squeals, rattles, grinding noises, popping – you might need an air conditioning repair. Worn belts, poor lubrication, or loose parts could also cause squealing or grinding noises. Popping or snapping noises could signal an electrical problem. Turn the unit off and call Dover-Phila Heating & Cooling right away. We offer 24/7 air conditioning repair and can get your unit up and running again quickly.

Leaks. A refrigerant leak is definitely a problem. Refrigerants are sealed into the system, they will escape if you have a slow leak. Low refrigerant levels will cause your unit to malfunction or circulate uncooled air. It could also cause your evaporator coil to freeze. If you see any liquids around your compressor unit (outside), turn the unit off and give us a call. Refrigerants are toxic, so keep children and pets away from them until we can complete your air conditioning repair.

You might also see condensation near your air handler or evaporator inside your home. Although a puddle here is just water, it still can signal trouble. Indoor units (evaporators) have a drain line that could get clogged. Rust may have eaten the condensate drain pan. Third, a condensate pump removes water from the indoor unit, but if it’s not working, the water could spill out. Finally, a dirty or clogged air filter could be causing your evaporator coil to freeze. Don’t ignore any signs of liquid leaking from your air conditioning unit – whether it’s inside or outside!

More signs of air conditioning trouble

Smells. Bacteria and mold love moist air. They don’t care much about the temperature, though. Even if your air conditioning unit seems to be working fine, unusual or unpleasant smells can indicate trouble. A clogged drain line can host smelly bacterial growth, which can produce unpleasant odors in your home. Mold in your ductwork can also cause your home to smell musty. Regular maintenance can help ensure that molds and mildew don’t set up shop in your air conditioning system.

Short cycling. Your air conditioning unit turns on and off when the thermostat tells it to. Your cooling system could be fooled into turning on and off inappropriately or frequently. This is called short-cycling. Short-cycling wastes a lot of energy. Your electric bill will go up, and your air conditioning unit won’t work as well as it could. A number of different conditions could cause short-cycling, so it’s important to have a professional check your system if it seems to turn on and off too often, or if it’s having a hard time keeping up with the temperatures.

The professionals at Dover-Phila Heating & Cooling can help keep your air conditioning working at peak performance. No one likes an air conditioning repair, but acting fast when your unit begins to show signs of trouble is one way to prevent a bigger, more expensive repair. Regular maintenance on air conditioning units can also spot potential problems before they can cause an emergency service call.

Call us at (330) 343-5511 anytime to schedule a routine maintenance visit or an emergency repair.

Photo Credit: indignance, via Flickr